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                    EXTERIOR CATALYTIC WATER CONDITIONER &  SCALE INHIBITOR 
                                                                                                                    
The Salt-Free Alternative   PDF


 
 
Hard water entering the Catalytic Water Conditioner inlet flows across the
highly engineered catalyst element. The surface of this catalyst element consists
of millions of bi- and tri-metallic junctions similar in geometry to calcium carbonate
(Ca CO3), the dissolved mineral that makes water hard. Through a phenomenon called lattice matching, minerals attach to each other and form crystals. Minerals in solution
can also be made to attach to other surfaces with similar lattice patterns. Calcium
carbonate collects onto these catalyst element junctions.
(see diagram A)
These deposits form microscopic crystals that are less stable, but still attractive
to the calcium carbonate that remains in solution. This process is called nucleation
and is very familiar to those scientists who work in the areas of semiconductors,
physical chemistry and metallurgy. These crystals grow to a size between .0000004"
and .000004", which is too small to be seen with an optical microscope. Then they
are flushed off the catalyst surface due to the combination of crystal instability and
the shearing force of the flowing water. Billions of these calcium carbonate crystals, or calcite seeds, are now in the treated water exiting the Catalytic Water Conditioner. (see diagram B)
 
 
These billions of calcite seeds appear to be more attractive to dissolved calcium
carbonate than those surfaces.
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